Crowns


Porcelain Crowns

When the structure of a tooth has sustained significant damage, a dental crown is an ideal aesthetic and functional restorative solution.

As dentists, our goal is to always preserve your natural teeth whenever possible. By doing this, it helps maintain the bone structure in the jaw and keeps adjacent teeth stable. When placing a dental crown, we remove only the damaged portions of the tooth, leaving the root intact. 

The first step in getting a crown is having an impression taken to create a model of your teeth and bite so we can fabricate a crown that looks and functions like your natural tooth. Then, the tooth is prepared for the crown by removing areas of decay and other structural damage. Another set of impressions is taken, this time with the prepared tooth in order to ensure that the permanent crown will fit securely once it has been fabricated. 

A temporary crown is placed on the tooth to protect it from decay and damage while your permanent crown is being fabricated. Once we receive your permanent crown from the dental laboratory, you will come back to our office to have it placed. When we’re sure that it fits properly and feels right, we bond or cement the crown onto the prepared tooth. With proper care and oral hygiene, your crown may last a lifetime.

There are four common types of dental crowns:


Ceramic Crowns


Ceramic crowns are often used for teeth that are visible when you smile, as they are made from tooth-colored porcelain and have a natural appearance. Ceramic crowns are less strong than other options, so they are generally not used to restore molars.


Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns


This type of restoration has the strength and durability of metal with the aesthetics of ceramic, making it a great choice for many patients.


Gold Alloy Crowns


Gold alloys are the strongest material available for crowns. They are often used for molars and in patients who grind their teeth at night, as they are able to withstand a great deal of use.


Base Metal Alloy Crowns


These crowns are resistant to corrosion and very durable. They are often used when there is not enough tooth structure available to support other types of crown restorations.